Navigating the wheat free, gluten free diet

Posts tagged ‘gluten intolerance’

Gluten-free Tennis Pro Attributes Success to Diet

The Wall Street Journal called him “the world’s best athlete of 2011.”  He’s beaten Nadal four times straight.  His first name sounds like a last name.

His name is Novak Djokovic and if you’ve heard of him you’re at least one of the following:

1. A dude.

2. A dude who watches ESPN exclusively even when the “good” sports are off-season.

3. Rich.

4. Over 40.

If you haven’t, you’ll hear of him soon because he’s unstoppable on the tennis court. And I’m thinking his nutritionist got a big raise

See, Djokovic’s nutritionist discovered last year that he has a gluten allergy, and since he dropped it from his diet, his life on and off court has taken a turn. Says the journal,

Djokovic’s serve, sloppy as recently as last season, is now precise, fluid and, at times, devastating. His forehand used to break down in tense moments; now he hits winners that seem to subscribe to undiscovered laws of physics. His backhand, always solid, is now impenetrable, even with Nadal’s famously high-bouncing forehand.

The one change in his life? Deleting the wheat.

Even if Djokovic’s newfound confidence stems from going gluten-free only because he told himself it’s the cause (as the WSJ article suggests), one can’t deny the results.  Or the good press for GF dieters and undiagnosed celiacs everywhere–especially the dudes.  The more men who hear the words “gluten-free” and “gluten intolerance” and see the positive effects the diet can have, the more likely they’ll be to get diagnosed, instead of toughing it out in favor of “appearing weak.”

Results may vary.  Going gluten-free may not make you Superman, or the best tennis player the world has ever seen, but it will make you feel better.

-Taylor

Celiac Disease Causes Canker Sores

Did you know canker sores are a symptom of Celiac Disease? Me neither. When I found out (earlier today while reading an article about other dental issues caused by CD and continuing to procrastinate making that dentist appointment), I couldn’t make myself be surprised. Canker sores have long been a nuisance in my life. I mean, like most people I like to eat, so pretty much any time I get a canker sore (which is all the time lately), it’s a huge pain. (Really though, they hurt!)

But enough parenthetical remarks.

Celiac.com says canker sores might be the sole symptom of about 1 in 20 people with CD, so it’s worth getting tested or trying the GF diet just to see, especially because the people who participated in the study didn’t respond to canker sore medications.

And I know that those little monsters, which I’ve had a lot of lately, can also be caused by too much citrus and too much stress, both of which I’ve also had a lot of in my life lately. But I also wonder if my recurring canker sores are a sign that I may be glutening myself more than I know. So I’m trying my own elimination diet.

Eliminate the citrus? Done.

Eliminate the stress? Working on it.

If the inside of my mouth is still full of these burning white mounds of evil (okay, it’s just two a time, but still)  by my Master’s graduation on Friday, it’s time to stop eating out for a while.

We shall see!

-Taylor

WSJ Offers “Clues to Gluten Sensitivity”

The Wall Street Journal ran a story in their online health section yesterday about the adverse effects of gluten on people who test negative for Celiac Disease, the so-called “gluten sensitive” or “gluten intolerant.”

The story discusses a new study that provides evidence that gluten sensitivity has a very real effect on one’s intestines and immune system, in a different way than Celiac Disease.   It addresses the common problem that people have of doctors being quick to judge symptoms as being “in one’s head” as soon as the Celiac test comes back negative.

The problem with gluten sensitivity is that it’s hard to pin down, the article says:

Some experts think as many as 1 in 20 Americans may have some form of it, but there is no test or defined set of symptoms. The most common are IBS-like stomach problems, headaches, fatigue, numbness and depression, but more than 100 symptoms have been loosely linked to gluten intake, which is why it has been so difficult to study. Peter Green, director of the Celiac Disease Center says that research into gluten sensitivity today is roughly where celiac disease was 30 years ago.

As of now, the only real treatment for gluten sensitivity is a more lenient form of celiac disease treatment – a gluten-free diet with the possibility of some cheating in small amounts.

The article also includes a video and a nifty chart:

I hope this opens people’s eyes to the possibility that their stomach pain might not just be indigestion or too much cheese on their pizza.  As time goes by, more and more evidence seems to suggest that humans are not meant to be eating gluten, at least, not in such high quantities.  Not when there are so many delicious alternatives!

-Taylor

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